Adolescents and HIV/AIDS in East Asia and the Pacific. UNICEF (2005)

Adolescents and HIV/AIDS in East Asia and the Pacific. UNICEF (2005) The number of people living with HIV continues to grow in every region, with the steepest increases occurring in East Asia were HIV incidence has increased by 50 per cent between 2002 and 2004.

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Children and HIV/AIDS in Papua New Guinea. UNICEF (2005)

Children and HIV/AIDS in Papua New Guinea. UNICEF (2005) The Global Campaign on Children and AIDS launched worldwide on 25 October 2005 aims to put children at the centre of the global HIV/AIDS agenda. As part of this campaign, UNICEF and its partners have created an alliance to push for programmes to:
  • Prevent new infections among young people, particularly girls and women;
  • Prevent mother-to-child-transmission of HIV;
  • Provide adequate and appropriate paediatric treatment for children with HIV/AIDS;
  • Protect, care and support orphans and children affected by HIV/AIDS.


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East Asia: Children and HIV/AIDS- A Call to Action. UNICEF (2005)

East Asia: Children and HIV/AIDS- A Call to Action. UNICEF (2005) HIV/AIDS is a communicable disease that not only threatens sex workers, their clients and drug users. It is a disease that has already devastated the lives of hundreds of thousands of children and adolescents in East Asia and menaces millions more. More than any other modern-day pandemic, HIV/AIDS insinuates itself into the lives of children through so many different channels and damages them in so many ways. And its effects are long-lasting. Not only does HIV/AIDS claim the lives of children, it is robbing them of their parents, siblings, relatives, friends, teachers, caregivers and other role models. For many children – all too often girls – HIV/AIDS is denying them of their education, their future livelihoods, and their place in society. HIV/AIDS is also exacerbating economic and social disparities, making those who are infected poorer, and marginalizing those who are affected further.

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Pacific: Children and HIV/AIDS: A Call to Action. UNICEF (2005)

Pacific: Children and HIV/AIDS: A Call to Action. UNICEF (2005) Every day, thousands of children in the Pacific encounter numerous threats to their security and well-being: poverty, hunger, labour, sexual abuse, social instability and political upheaval. Today, they face an additional threat that not only menaces their lives, but could also unravel their countries’ development gains of the past 30 years and ultimately, wipe out the Pacific’s unique blend of different ethnicities and cultures: AIDS.

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Psychosocial Aspects of HIV/AIDS: Children & Adolescents. Close KL and Rigamonti AK (2005)

Psychosocial Aspects of HIV/AIDS: Children & Adolescents. Close KL and Rigamonti AK (2005) HIV/AIDS takes an enormous physical toll on those infected by the virus as well as those who care for them. However, the psychological toll of the epidemic is just as significant. The psychological and social effects of HIV/AIDS are magnified in young people. Children and adolescents are an ever-growing part of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. In 2004, an estimated 2.2 million children under the age of 15 were living with HIV.

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Women, Children and HIV/AIDS in East Asia and the Pacific. UNICEF (2005)

Women, Children and HIV/AIDS in East Asia and the Pacific. UNICEF (2005) An estimated 1,700 children under the age of 15 are infected by HIV around the globe everyday. Many of these are young children, infected at birth by mothers who are unaware of their HIV status. The number continues to rise as more women are infected by partners who adopt high risk behaviours such as injecting drugs, buying sex, and having multiple sexual partners.

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A Framework for the Protection, Care and Support of Orphans and Vulnerable Children Living in a World with HIV and AIDS. UNAIDS and UNICEF (2004)

A Framework for the Protection, Care and Support of Orphans and Vulnerable Children Living in a World with HIV and AIDS. UNAIDS and UNICEF (2004) By 2010, the number of children orphaned by AIDS globally is expected to exceed 25 million. But that is just a fraction of the number of children whose lives will have been radically altered by the impact of HIV/AIDS on their families, communities, schools, health care and welfare systems and local and national economies. With rates of HIV infection on the rise in many regions of the world, this crisis for children will persist for decades, even as prevention and treatment programmes are expanded.

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Core Commitments for Children in Emergencies. UNICEF (2004)

Core Commitments for Children in Emergencies. UNICEF (2004) Since its inception, UNICEF’s mandate has involved the rapid response to humanitarian crises. Our continuing presence in more than 150 countries and territories means that we are often on the spot long before, and long after, a crisis or unstable situation occurs.

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Delivering on Child Rights in South Asia: Our Commitment on HIV/AIDS, Children and Young People. UNICEF (2004)

Delivering on Child Rights in South Asia: Our Commitment on HIV/AIDS, Children and Young People. UNICEF (2004) Across the region of South Asia, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is threatening to reverse the hard- won child survival gains of the past decades. Over 5.2 million people in South Asia are estimated to be infected with HIV/AIDS as of end 2003, of whom up to one-quarter are aged under 25 years. The data is dominated by the epidemic in India where some 5.1 million people were estimated to be living with HIV/AIDS by the end of 2003. (UNAIDS/WHO 2004).

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Future Forsaken: Abuses against Children Affected by HIV/AIDS in India. Human Rights Watch (2004)

Future Forsaken: Abuses against Children Affected by HIV/AIDS in India. Human Rights Watch (2004) Six-year-old Anu P.’s teacher sent her home from kindergarten in 2003, instructing her older sister to tell her “please not to come again to the school.”1 Her grandfather, who had been caring for Anu and her siblings since their parents died of AIDS, explained, “The teacher didn’t allow her to come to school because she believes Anu is HIV-positive. I believe that other parents were talking amongst themselves, so the teacher said she shouldn’t come.” Her grandfather told us he was afraid that if he protested, Anu’s older sister might be sent out as well.

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Highlighted publications
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Nepal-IBBS-FIDU-Kathmandu-valley-RI-2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_Get_on_the_Fast-Track_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NEC_HIV_July-Oct-AIDSreg2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_methods_for_deriving_estimates_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_Global_AIDS_Response_Progress_Reporting_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/2015_Size_Estimation_of_Key_Affected_Populations_in_Philippines.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Assessment_of_Decentralization_of_ART_in_MMR_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS-2016-prevention-gap-report_en.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_AIDS_by_the_numbers_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_Biomedical_AIDS_research_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Implementing_comprehensive_HIV_and_STI_programmes_with_transgender_people_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_cities_ending_the_aids_epidemic_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Philippines_2015_IHBSS_Factsheets.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Pakistan_IBBS_Report_Punjab_2014_0.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Integrating_collaborative_TB_and_HIV_services_within_a_comprehensive_package_of_care_for_PWID_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/India_IBBS_report_2014-15.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/India_HSS_report_2014-15.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/The_negative_impact_of_drug_control_on_public_health_2015.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/2015_young_people_drugs_en.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Death_Penalty_for_Drug_Offences_Global_Overview_2015.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Transforming_our_world_2015_UN.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Consolidated_on_the_use_of_antiretroviral_drugs_for_treating_and_preventing_HIV_infection_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Consolidated_Strategic_Information_Guidelines_for_HIV_in_Health_Sector_2015.pdf
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