Pacific: Children and HIV/AIDS: A Call to Action. UNICEF (2005)

Pacific: Children and HIV/AIDS: A Call to Action. UNICEF (2005) Every day, thousands of children in the Pacific encounter numerous threats to their security and well-being: poverty, hunger, labour, sexual abuse, social instability and political upheaval. Today, they face an additional threat that not only menaces their lives, but could also unravel their countries’ development gains of the past 30 years and ultimately, wipe out the Pacific’s unique blend of different ethnicities and cultures: AIDS.

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Psychosocial Aspects of HIV/AIDS: Children & Adolescents. Close KL and Rigamonti AK (2005)

Psychosocial Aspects of HIV/AIDS: Children & Adolescents. Close KL and Rigamonti AK (2005) HIV/AIDS takes an enormous physical toll on those infected by the virus as well as those who care for them. However, the psychological toll of the epidemic is just as significant. The psychological and social effects of HIV/AIDS are magnified in young people. Children and adolescents are an ever-growing part of the HIV/AIDS epidemic. In 2004, an estimated 2.2 million children under the age of 15 were living with HIV.

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Women, Children and HIV/AIDS in East Asia and the Pacific. UNICEF (2005)

Women, Children and HIV/AIDS in East Asia and the Pacific. UNICEF (2005) An estimated 1,700 children under the age of 15 are infected by HIV around the globe everyday. Many of these are young children, infected at birth by mothers who are unaware of their HIV status. The number continues to rise as more women are infected by partners who adopt high risk behaviours such as injecting drugs, buying sex, and having multiple sexual partners.

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A Framework for the Protection, Care and Support of Orphans and Vulnerable Children Living in a World with HIV and AIDS. UNAIDS and UNICEF (2004)

A Framework for the Protection, Care and Support of Orphans and Vulnerable Children Living in a World with HIV and AIDS. UNAIDS and UNICEF (2004) By 2010, the number of children orphaned by AIDS globally is expected to exceed 25 million. But that is just a fraction of the number of children whose lives will have been radically altered by the impact of HIV/AIDS on their families, communities, schools, health care and welfare systems and local and national economies. With rates of HIV infection on the rise in many regions of the world, this crisis for children will persist for decades, even as prevention and treatment programmes are expanded.

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Core Commitments for Children in Emergencies. UNICEF (2004)

Core Commitments for Children in Emergencies. UNICEF (2004) Since its inception, UNICEF’s mandate has involved the rapid response to humanitarian crises. Our continuing presence in more than 150 countries and territories means that we are often on the spot long before, and long after, a crisis or unstable situation occurs.

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Delivering on Child Rights in South Asia: Our Commitment on HIV/AIDS, Children and Young People. UNICEF (2004)

Delivering on Child Rights in South Asia: Our Commitment on HIV/AIDS, Children and Young People. UNICEF (2004) Across the region of South Asia, the HIV/AIDS epidemic is threatening to reverse the hard- won child survival gains of the past decades. Over 5.2 million people in South Asia are estimated to be infected with HIV/AIDS as of end 2003, of whom up to one-quarter are aged under 25 years. The data is dominated by the epidemic in India where some 5.1 million people were estimated to be living with HIV/AIDS by the end of 2003. (UNAIDS/WHO 2004).

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Future Forsaken: Abuses against Children Affected by HIV/AIDS in India. Human Rights Watch (2004)

Future Forsaken: Abuses against Children Affected by HIV/AIDS in India. Human Rights Watch (2004) Six-year-old Anu P.’s teacher sent her home from kindergarten in 2003, instructing her older sister to tell her “please not to come again to the school.”1 Her grandfather, who had been caring for Anu and her siblings since their parents died of AIDS, explained, “The teacher didn’t allow her to come to school because she believes Anu is HIV-positive. I believe that other parents were talking amongst themselves, so the teacher said she shouldn’t come.” Her grandfather told us he was afraid that if he protested, Anu’s older sister might be sent out as well.

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HIV Transmission through Breastfeeding: A Review of Available Evidence. UNICEF, UNAIDS, WHO, et al (2004)

HIV Transmission through Breastfeeding: A Review of Available Evidence. UNICEF, UNAIDS, WHO, et al (2004) Exclusive breastfeeding – breastfeeding with no other food or drink, not even water – is the ideal mode of infant feeding for the first six months of life. For optimal growth, development and health, infants should be exclusively breastfed for their first six months, and should then receive nutritionally adequate and safe complementary foods, while breastfeeding continues up to 24 months or beyond.

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Infant Feeding: A Compilation of Programmatic Evidence. USAID, UNICEF, Quality Assurance Project, et al (2004)

Infant Feeding: A Compilation of Programmatic Evidence. USAID, UNICEF, Quality Assurance Project, et al (2004) The United Nations-led process of updat- ing the 1998 international guidelines related to infant feeding and the preven- tion of maternal-to-child-transmission (pMTCT) of HIV called for a review of recent programmatic experience in addi- tion to a review of the new scientific and medical evidence. This document represents an attempt to compile and synthesise reports on a wide variety of relevant programmes conducted since the 1998 guidelines were issued. The programmes presented here range in scale from small community research projects to national programmes. This document is the prod- uct of a one-year collaboration between the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Quality Assurance Project (QAP), managed by University Research Co., LLC (URC). Valuable technical inputs were also received from the World Health Orga- nization (WHO) and many individuals and organisations directly involved in HIV and infant feeding programmes. This review brings together in one document a num- ber of important experiences and provides insights that were useful to those involved in updating international guidelines and those involved in adapting them to local settings. It should also serve as a valuable resource to those involved in developing or scaling-up pMTCT-related programmes in the future.

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Knowledge Attitude Behaviour Practices Study for Street Children in Karachi. Pakistan Voluntary Health and Nutrition Association (2004)

KABPS Study for Street Children in Karachi. Pakistan Voluntary Health and Nutrition Association (2004) The Knowledge Attitude Behaviour Practices [KABPs] Study for Street Children in Karachi was carried out on 503 respondents in the age group 10 – 24 years. Of these 495 were males and 8 were females. The maximum proportion of the children were between 13-16 years of age (32.61%). Largest proportion of the children were from Punjab (29.6%) followed by Bengalis (24.9%), Karachi (20.5%) and Pashtoons (10.1%). Most of the sample children had both parents alive (55.9%) and living together (92.8%) but quarrelling frequently with each other (67.5%). They had an average of six siblings each (86.2%) and were mostly second- or middle borners (60.4%).


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Highlighted publications
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_Annual_report_2016-17.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Cambodia_Estimations_and_projections_of_HIV_AIDS_at_Sub-national_level_2016-2020.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_HIV_drug_resistance_report_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Guidelines_on_public_health_response_to_pretreatment_HIV_drug_resistance_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Guidelines_for_Managing_Advanced_HIV_Disease_and_Rapid_Initiation_of_ART_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_What_New_in_Treatment_Monitoring_Viral_Load_and_CD4_Testing_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Pakistan_IBBS_2016-17.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Pakistan_Mapping_Key_Populations_2015-16.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_Global_AIDS_Update_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_Global_AIDS_Update_2017_Data_2017_en.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Myanmar_National_Strategic_Plan_on_HIV_and_AIDS_2016-2020.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_2017_Global_AIDS_Monitoring_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Nepal-IBBS-FIDU-Kathmandu-valley-RI-2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_methods_for_deriving_estimates_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/2015_Size_Estimation_of_Key_Affected_Populations_in_Philippines.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Assessment_of_Decentralization_of_ART_in_MMR_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS-2016-prevention-gap-report_en.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_Biomedical_AIDS_research_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Implementing_comprehensive_HIV_and_STI_programmes_with_transgender_people_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_cities_ending_the_aids_epidemic_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Philippines_2015_IHBSS_Fact_Sheets_Nov2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Integrating_collaborative_TB_and_HIV_services_within_a_comprehensive_package_of_care_for_PWID_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/India_IBBS_report_2014-15.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/India_HSS_report_2014-15.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Transforming_our_world_2015_UN.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Consolidated_on_the_use_of_antiretroviral_drugs_for_treating_and_preventing_HIV_infection_2016.pdf
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