Vulnerability of Bangladeshi street-children to HIV/AIDS: A Situation Analysis. Uddin J, Sarma H, Nahar Q, et al. (2011)

immage

The overall objective of the research was to analyze the vulnerability of street-children to HIV/AIDS in Dhaka city. The specific aims were to:

a. Determine the range of experiences and behaviours of street-children that put them at risk of HIV/AIDS and

b. Compare the vulnerability of different groups of street-children [living in the street without family (abandoned), living in the street with family, and working in the street and returning to the family at night—both males and females].

Download Publication

Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection in Infants and Children: Towards Universal Access Recommendations for a Public Health Approach 2010 Revision. WHO (2010)

Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection in Infants and Children: Towards Universal Access Recommendations for a Public Health Approach 2010 Revision. WHO (2010) Tremendous progress has been made over the past few years in diagnosing and treating infants and children with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, much remains to be done to effectively scale-up and sustain prevention efforts and treatment services for all in need. The most efficient and cost-effective way to tackle paediatric HIV globally is to reduce mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). In 2008, an estimated 45% of pregnant women living with HIV received antiretrovirals (ARVs) to prevent transmission of HIV to their children. However, every day, there are nearly 1 200 new infections in children less than 15 years of age, more than 90% of them occurring in the developing world and most being the result of transmission from mother to child.

Download this publication

Children and AIDS: Fifth Stocktaking Report. UNICEF (2010)

Children and AIDS: Fifth Stocktaking Report. UNICEF (2010)

For nearly three decades, HIV and AIDS have been devastating individuals and families with the tragedy of untimely death and medical, financial and social burdens. Although children’s concerns have always been present within the great spectrum of need associated with HIV, they have to some extent been overshadowed by the very scale of the epidemic in the adult population.



Download this publication

Countdown to 2015 Decade Report (2000–2010): Taking Stock of Maternal, Newborn and Child Survival. WHO and UNICEF (2010)

The State of the World’s Children 2004. UNICEF (2004) The Countdown report for 2010 contains good news—many countries are making progress, reducing mortality and increasing coverage of effective health interventions at an accelerating pace.

Download this publication

Guidelines on HIV and Infant Feeding: Principles and Recommendations for Infant Feeding in the Context of HIV and A Summary of Evidence. WHO, UNAIDS, UNFPA, et al (2010)

Guidelines on HIV and Infant Feeding: Principles and Recommendations for Infant Feeding in the Context of HIV and A Summary of Evidence. WHO, UNAIDS, UNFPA, et al (2010) Significant programmatic experience and research evidence regarding HIV and infant feeding have accumulated since recommendations on infant feeding in the context of HIV were last revised in 2006. In particular, evidence has been reported that antiret- roviral (ARV) interventions to either the HIV-infected mother or HIV-exposed infant can significantly reduce the risk of postnatal transmission of HIV through breastfeeding. This evidence has major implications for how women living with HIV might feed their infants, and how health workers should counsel these mothers. In light of this, the World Health Organization (WHO) commenced a guideline development process, culminat- ing in a Guideline Development Group meeting in Geneva on 22–23 October 2009. The process was carried out as outlined in the WHO handbook for guideline development.

Download this publication

Kiribati Family Health and Support Study: A Study on Violence against Women and Children. Secretariat of the Pacific Community. (2010)

immage

The study sought to quantify the prevalence of violence against women and children and identify the most common causes of violence. This information is intended to form the basis for interventions that would in the long term minimise and, it is hoped, ultimately eliminate the drivers of violence against women and children. Prior to conducting the study it had been an accepted fact that violence against women and children occurs in Kiribati, just as it does in many other countries of the region. What was difficult to know was the magnitude of the problem. The Kiribati Family Health and Support Study has for the first time in the history of the country provided a picture of just how prevalent and serious this problem is. The finding in the study that 68% of women (2 in 3) between the ages of 15 and 49 years who have ever entered into relationships have reported experiencing physical or sexual violence, or both, by an intimate partner, is a very serious cause for concern.

 

Keywords: HIV, violence, child, women, abuse, partners

Download Publication

Access to Essential Needs and Services for Children – Orphans and Poverty Status: A study on Cambodia, Thailand and Viet Nam. UNICEF (2009)

Access to Essential Needs and Services for Children – Orphans and Poverty Status: A study on Cambodia, Thailand and Viet Nam. UNICEF (2009) This study used household survey data from Cambodia, Thailand and Viet Nam to examine the situation of orphans relative to children in poverty regarding access to essential needs and services, focusing on basic material needs and education outcomes. This study made use of summary statistics and multivariate regression analysis to determine whether poverty accounts for the education gap between orphans and non-orphans, or whether other factors also contribute to the lower education outcomes of orphans. A similar analysis was done on children’s possession of basic materials – namely a blanket, a pair of shoes and two sets of clothes - which exemplify the capacity of families to protect and care for children.

Download this publication

Children and AIDS Fourth Stocktaking Report, 2009. UNICEF (2009)

The State of the World’s Children 2004. UNICEF (2004) Years ago, when the devastating impact of the AIDS epidemic on children was just becoming apparent, there was no way to imagine an AIDS-free generation in the foreseeable future.

Download this publication

Children and AIDS: Country Fact Sheets 2009. UNICEF, UNAIDS and WHO (2009)

Children and AIDS: Country Fact Sheets 2009. UNICEF, UNAIDS and WHO (2009) The Children and AIDS Fact Sheets in this publication reflect the situation of children affected by AIDS in low and middle-income countries and territories. They capture the minimum data needed to monitor progress associated with Unite for Children, Unite against AIDS in relation to the ‘Four Ps’: Prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV; Provide paediatric treatment; Prevent
infection among adolescents and young people; and Protect and support children affected by HIV and AIDS. The fact sheets contain statistics currently available in UNICEF global databases on key indicators for children and AIDS. These databases contain only statistically sound and nationally representative data from household surveys, including Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) and Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS), and national programme statistics.

Download this publication

HIV and Infant Feeding: Revised Principles and Recommendations Rapid Advice. WHO (2009)

HIV and Infant Feeding: Revised Principles and Recommendations Rapid Advice. WHO (2009) WHO recommendations on infant feeding and HIV were last revised in 2006 (pub- lished in 2007 as an HIV and Infant Feeding Update – ISBN 978 92 4 159596 41). Signifi- cant programmatic experience and research evidence regarding HIV and infant feeding have accumulated since then. In particular, evidence has been reported that antiretro- viral (ARV) interventions to either the HIV-infected mother or HIV-exposed infant can significantly reduce the risk of postnatal transmission of HIV through breastfeeding. This has major implications for how women living with HIV might choose to feed their infants, and how health workers should counsel mothers when making these choices. The potential of ARVs to reduce HIV transmission throughout the period of breastfeed- ing also highlights the need for guidance on how child health services should commu- nicate information about ARVs to prevent transmission through breastfeeding, and the implications for feeding of HIV exposed infants through the first two years of life.

Download this publication

Pages

database
Highlighted publications
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_Status_of_National_AIDS_Response_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_State_Epi_factsheets_V1_North-East_region_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_State_Epi_factsheets_V2_West_South_region_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_State_Epi_factsheets_V3_Northern_Central_Eastern_region_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_Annual_report_2016-17.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Cambodia_Estimations_and_projections_of_HIV_AIDS_at_Sub-national_level_2016-2020.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_HIV_drug_resistance_report_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Guidelines_on_public_health_response_to_pretreatment_HIV_drug_resistance_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Guidelines_for_Managing_Advanced_HIV_Disease_and_Rapid_Initiation_of_ART_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_What_New_in_Treatment_Monitoring_Viral_Load_and_CD4_Testing_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Pakistan_IBBS_2016-17.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Pakistan_Mapping_Key_Populations_2015-16.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_Global_AIDS_Update_2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_Global_AIDS_Update_2017_Data_2017_en.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Myanmar_National_Strategic_Plan_on_HIV_and_AIDS_2016-2020.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_2017_Global_AIDS_Monitoring_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Nepal-IBBS-FIDU-Kathmandu-valley-RI-2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_methods_for_deriving_estimates_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/2015_Size_Estimation_of_Key_Affected_Populations_in_Philippines.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Assessment_of_Decentralization_of_ART_in_MMR_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS-2016-prevention-gap-report_en.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_Biomedical_AIDS_research_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Implementing_comprehensive_HIV_and_STI_programmes_with_transgender_people_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_cities_ending_the_aids_epidemic_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Philippines_2015_IHBSS_Fact_Sheets_Nov2017.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Integrating_collaborative_TB_and_HIV_services_within_a_comprehensive_package_of_care_for_PWID_2016.pdf
http://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Consolidated_on_the_use_of_antiretroviral_drugs_for_treating_and_preventing_HIV_infection_2016.pdf
Calendar of events
Dec
17
Mar
1
(1 Mar - 1 Mar)
Mar
3