Preventing HIV/AIDS in Young People: A Systematic Review of the Evidence from Developing Countries. UNAIDS, UNFPA, UNICEF, et al (2006)

Preventing HIV/AIDS in Young People: A Systematic Review of the Evidence from Developing Countries. UNAIDS, UNFPA, UNICEF, et al (2006) The majority of HIV infected children acquire the virus from their HIV infected mothers around the time of delivery or during breastfeeding. The most efficient and cost effective way to tackle paediatric HIV globally is, therefore, to reduce mother-to-child transmission (MTCT). However, every day there are nearly 1500 new infections in children under 15 years of age, more than 90% occurring in the developing world [1, 2]. HIV-infected infants frequently present with clinical symptoms in the first year of life, by one year of age an estimated one-third of infected infants will have died, and about half by 2 years of age [2, 3]. Early recognition of HIV exposure and diagnosis of HIV is crucial and can save lives by enabling early initiation of appropriate care including ART.

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Project Performance Assessment Report Indonesia: Indonesia HIV/AIDS and STDs Prevention and Management Project. The World Bank (2005)

Project Performance Assessment Report Indonesia: Indonesia HIV/AIDS and STDs Prevention and Management Project. The World Bank (2005) The Operations Evaluation Department assesses the programs and activities of the World Bank for two purposes: first, to ensure the integrity of the Bank’s self-evaluation process and to verify that the Bank’s work is producing the expected results, and second, to help develop improved directions, policies, and procedures through the dissemination of lessons drawn from experience. As part of this work, OED annually assesses about 25 percent of the Bank’s lending operations.


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“3 by 5” Progress Report 2004. UNAIDS and WHO (2005)

“3 by 5” Progress Report 2004. UNAIDS and WHO (2005) In the second half of 2004, the number of people on antiretroviral (ARV) therapy in developing and transitional countries increased dramatically from 440 000 to an estimated 700 000. This figure represents about 12% of the approximately 5.8 million people currently needing treatment in developing and transitional countries and includes people receiving ARV therapy supported by the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the United States President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief, the World Bank and other partners.

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Standard Operating Procedures for Antiretroviral Therapy. FHI-Impact and USAID (2005)

Standard Operating Procedures for Antiretroviral Therapy. FHI, Impact and USAID (2005) With significant reduction in the cost of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs, access to antiretroviral therapy (ART) has become increasingly real for people in low-resource settings. In many countries, governments have developed national guidelines on ART management to define care standards and establish protocols for such areas as eligibility criteria, drug regimens and monitoring HIV-infected clients on ART.

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Papua New Guinea: Establishment of Pilot HIV/AIDS Care Centers. ADB (2005)

Papua New Guinea: Establishment of Pilot HIV/AIDS Care Centers. ADB (2005) ince 1987, 9851 cases have been reported as HIV positive out of a total population of 5.4 millions (June, 2004). From consensus workshop in November, 2004, an estimated number of HIV positive among 15-49 year age group was between 45,000- 75,000 cases. Among reported case, 52.0 % were male and 48.0% were female. Heterosexual (79.9%) is the predominant mode of transmission, 93.6 % is adult. The majority of HIV/AIDS cases have been found in the National Capital District (60.8 %) and Western Highland (14,3 %) province.

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Policy Brief: Antiretroviral Therapy and Injecting Drug Users. WHO, UNODC and UNAIDS. (2005)

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This policy brief reviews the evidence to date on providing antiretroviral (ARV) therapy to HIV-positive injecting drug users. A number of related medical, psychological and social issues are also addressed including the need to manage drug interactions and the benefi t of harm reduction interventions in supporting optimum care for HIV-positive injecting drug users.

 

Keywords: HIV/AIDS, IDU, ARV, treatment, prison

 

 

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Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV Positive Adults and Adolescents in Pakistan. National AIDS Control Program Pakistan (2005)

Guidelines for the Use of Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV Positive Adults and Adolescents in Pakistan. National AIDS Control Program Pakistan (2005) Successful treatment of HIV/AIDS depends on strict adherence by HIV positive patients in taking their medications as instructed and for health care providers to recommend antiretroviral treatment (ART) based on rigorous scientific evidence. The devastating consequences of incorrect or partial HIV treatment are premature death, increased morbidity, development of drug resistant HIV strains, and lack of further treatment options.

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Progress on Global Access to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy. UNAIDS and WHO (2005)

Progress on Global Access to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy. UNAIDS and WHO (2005) Since late 2003, when WHO and UNAIDS launched a strategy for ensuring treatment for 3 million people living with HIV/AIDS in low- and middle-income countries by the end of 2005 (the “3 by 5” target), coverage of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in these countries has more than doubled – increasing from 400 000 to approximately 1 million people receiving treatment at the end of June 2005. To date, 14 of these countries are providing ART to at least 50 per cent of those who need it, consistent with the “3 by 5” target.

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China: Summary Country Profile for HIV/AIDS Treatment Scale-Up. WHO (2005)

China: Summary Country Profile for HIV/AIDS Treatment Scale-Up. WHO (2005) China has a low overall HIV prevalence but high prevalence in certain population groups and at some sites. WHO/UNAIDS estimated that 840 000 people in 0–49 years old were living with HIV/AIDS at the end of 2004, and the estimated HIV prevalence was 0.07% (with a low estimate of 0.05% and a high estimate of 0.08%). There are geographical differences in prevalence levels within subpopulations. Since 2001, reported HIV/AIDS cases have increased at a 30% annual rate, most likely as a result of increased surveillance. HIV is reported from 31 of China’s 34 provinces and other administrative units on mainland China.

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Myanmar: Summary Country Profile for HIV/AIDS Treatment Scale up. WHO (2005)

Myanmar: Summary Country Profile for HIV/AIDS Treatment Scale up. WHO (2005) With national estimated prevalence of between 0.6% and 2.2%, Myanmar is experiencing a generalized epidemic, considered one of the most serious in Asia. The Ministry of Health estimates that 338 911 adults aged 15–49 years old were living with HIV/AIDS in September 2004, of which 96 834 (28.6%) were women, indicating a total adult prevalence rate of 1.3%. HIV infection rates vary across the country, with several regions showing considerable increases in prevalence rates among less vulnerable populations. According to the Ministry of Health, in 2003, 12 of 29 sentinel sites for pregnant women showed a prevalence of HIV infection exceeding 2%. At Pyay and Hpa-an, prevalence rates among pregnant women were as high as 5% and 7.5% respectively.

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https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_State_Epi_factsheets_V3_Northern_Central_Eastern_region_2017.pdf
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