Health Sector Response to Gender-based Violence: An Assessment of the Asia Pacific Region. UNFPA (2010)

Gender Differences in KAP Related to HIV/AIDS among Freshmen in Afghan University. Mansoor AB, Fungladda W, Kaewkungwal J, et al (2008)

Gender-based violence (GBV) is well recognised as a human rights violation and a public health problem with legal, social, cultural, economic and psychological dimensions. Violence against women and girls cuts across class, race, religion and ethnicity and is today no longer viewed as a private matter. Among the impacts are a wide range of health consequences including sexually transmitted infections (STIs), HIV and AIDS, unintended pregnancies, psychological disorders, deprival of sexual and reproductive rights and diminished well-being. The severe costs of violence against women incurred by children, families, communities and the state are thus well demonstrated and thoroughly documented by the data.

 

 

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Submission to the United Nations Periodic Review on Violence Against Women: Fiji. Executive Summary on Violence Against Women. Fiji Women’s Crisis Centre (2010)

Gender Differences in KAP Related to HIV/AIDS among Freshmen in Afghan University. Mansoor AB, Fungladda W, Kaewkungwal J, et al (2008)

The Fiji Women’s Crisis Centre (FWCC) is an autonomous, multi racial non-governmental organization established in 1984. The Fiji Women's Crisis Centre is committed towards the elimination of violence against women in Fiji and the Pacific through the provision of crisis counseling and support services to women and children who are survivors of violence and advocating for policy and legislative changes through lobbying, training and networking and institutional support. The FWCC firmly believes in working under the rule of law, democracy and human rights.

 

 

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The United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence Against Women, Annual Report. UNWOMEN (2010)

Gender Differences in KAP Related to HIV/AIDS among Freshmen in Afghan University. Mansoor AB, Fungladda W, Kaewkungwal J, et al (2008)

The United Nations Trust Fund in Support of Actions to Eliminate Violence against Women (UN Trust Fund) is a leading multilateral grant-making mechanism exclusively dedicated to supporting country and local level actions to end violence against women and girls. The UN Trust Fund was established by UN General Assembly Resolution 50/166 in 1996 and is managed by UN Women on behalf of the UN system. To date, the UN Trust Fund has supported 317 programmes in 124 countries and territories with over $60 million in grants, awarded through an open, transparent and merit-based process.

 

 

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The United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence Against Women, Evaluation Report 2009. UNIFEM (2010)

Gender Differences in KAP Related to HIV/AIDS among Freshmen in Afghan University. Mansoor AB, Fungladda W, Kaewkungwal J, et al (2008)

This report presents the results of the evaluation of the United Nations Trust Fund in Support of Actions to Eliminate Violence against Women. Its importance is closely related to the current growing global momentum on ending violence against women and girls, including the General Assembly Resolutions from 2006 and 2007 on Intensification of Actions to Eliminate Violence Against Women and most recently, with the launch of the Secretary-General’s Campaign ‘UNiTE to end violence against women’.

 

 

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The United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence Against Women, Strategy 2010-2015, Vision 2015. UNWOMEN (2010)

Gender Differences in KAP Related to HIV/AIDS among Freshmen in Afghan University. Mansoor AB, Fungladda W, Kaewkungwal J, et al (2008)

The Strategy focuses on the following key areas, in line the Secretary General’s UNiTE to End Violence Against Women Campaign 2008-2015: Translating the promise to end violence against women into practice, paving the way to knowledge-based action on ending violence against women, realizing the potential of a United Nations Global Fund. The UN Trust Fund has a key role to play in ending violence against women and girls by supporting the Secretary-General’s UNiTE Campaign and by galvanizing governments, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector to join in the effort.

 

 

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United Nations Secretary-General’s Campaign Asia-Pacific UNiTE to End Violence against Women. UNWOMEN (2010)

Gender Differences in KAP Related to HIV/AIDS among Freshmen in Afghan University. Mansoor AB, Fungladda W, Kaewkungwal J, et al (2008)

Launched in 2008, United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s UNiTE to End Violence against Women campaign is a multi-year effort aimed at preventing and eliminating violence against women and girls in all parts of the world. It was developed to support and strengthen efforts in the region to end violence against women and girls. Asia-Pacific UNiTE aims to raise public awareness and to increase political will and resources for preventing and responding to violence against women and girls in the Asia-Pacific region. The campaign seeks to create a favourable and supportive environment for governments, in partnership with civil society, experts, entities of the United Nations system and other stakeholders to fulfill existing policy commitments.

 

 

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Violence against Women - A Public Health Perspective: Project Report Fiji 2010. Tuiketei T and Rokoduru A (2010)

Gender Differences in KAP Related to HIV/AIDS among Freshmen in Afghan University. Mansoor AB, Fungladda W, Kaewkungwal J, et al (2008)

WHO launched the Global Report on "Violence and Health" in 2002. The recommendations include a call on member countries to: create, implement and monitor a national action plan for violence prevention; enhance capacity for collecting data on violence; define priorities and support research on prevention of violence; promote primary prevention responses; strengthen responses for victims of violence; integrate violence prevention into social and educational policies, and thereby promote gender and social equality; and increase collaboration and exchange of information on violence prevention.

 

 

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Violence against Women, A Public Health Perspective Project Report. Ministry of Health, Fiji National University, WHO, (2010)

Gender Differences in KAP Related to HIV/AIDS among Freshmen in Afghan University. Mansoor AB, Fungladda W, Kaewkungwal J, et al (2008)

The VAW project team was commissioned by the World Health Organization (WHO) South Pacific office in July 2010, to conduct a host of VAW activities as components of the Project in Fiji. This report is one of the main outcomes of that partnership between the College of Medicine, Nursing & Health Science (formerly known as Fiji School of Medicine) /Fiji National University, Ministry of Health Fiji and WHO.

 

 

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National Gender Equality Policy and Framework for Operationalisation Consolidating President Mohamed Nasheed’s Policy Statement into Public Policy and Action for Change Republic of Maldives. UNFPA (2009)

Gender Differences in KAP Related to HIV/AIDS among Freshmen in Afghan University. Mansoor AB, Fungladda W, Kaewkungwal J, et al (2008)

The National Gender Equality Policy and Framework for Action consolidates President Mohamed Nasheed’s women’s policy framework announced in the International Women’s Day (2009) statement into public policy. The draft includes recommendations for an effective NWM/ Lead Agency for gender mainstreaming, and the tools for gender mainstreaming, and is targeted at realising change through coherent, focused, strategic, rights-based, result-oriented action for gender equality.

 

 

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Domestic Violence against Women in Cambodia: Husband’s Control, Frequency of Spousal Discussion, and Domestic Violence Reported by Cambodian Women. Eng, S., Li, Y., Mulsow, M., & Fischer, J. (2009)

Gender Differences in KAP Related to HIV/AIDS among Freshmen in Afghan University. Mansoor AB, Fungladda W, Kaewkungwal J, et al (2008)

This study sought to examine the effects of husband’s control and frequency of spousal discussion on domestic violence against Cambodian married women, using the 2005 Cambodia Demographic and Health Survey data. The sample included 1,707 married women, aged 16 49 (M=35.14). Structural Equation Modeling showed that husband’s control positively predicted both emotional and physical violence. Frequency of spousal discussion positively predicted emotional violence, an association consistent with the idea that a husband holding patriarchal beliefs would interpret women’s more frequent discussion as a violation of Cambodian norms for quiet, submissive wives.

 

 

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