Integrated Bio-Behavioral Survey (IBBS) among Male Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) in Pokhara. New ERA, STD/AIDS Counseling and Training Service, FHI, et al (2005)

Integrated Bio-Behavioral Survey (IBBS) among Male Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) In Pokhara. FHI and USAID (2005) HIV transmission among drug users is associated with injecting drug use that involves the sharing of needles or syringes. Risky sexual behavior associated with drug use also contributes to the spread of HIV. Injecting drug users function as a “bridging population” for HIV transmission between a core HIV risk group, other high-risk groups and the general population. The main objective of this study was “to estimate the prevalence rate of HIV among injecting drug users (IDUs) and assess their risky behavior". The study was conducted in the Pokhara Valley. Three hundred male IDUs were sampled using the respondent driven sampling (RDS) methodology. While structured questionnaires were used to collect behavioral data, clinical blood tests were used to determine the rate of HIV infection. The clinical test procedure used involved collecting blood from a subject’s pricked finger and then storing it in 2-4 capillary tubes until tests could be performed. In order to determine a participant's infection status, a rapid test kit algorithm was used in which two rapid tests (Capillus and Determine) were initially conducted with Uni-Gold reserved as a tie-breaker. In terms of socio-demographic characteristics, the study found that the median age of the IDUs was 23 years. This is almost similar to the findings of the first round of the survey. A majority of the IDUs had never been married. For the 34% of the IDUs who were ever married, the median age at marriage was 20 years. A majority of the IDUs had formal schooling. IDUs from different ethnic backgrounds participated in the study.

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Integrated Bio-Behavioral Survey (IBBS) among Male Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) in the Kathmandu Valley. New ERA, STD/AIDS Counseling and Training Service, FHI, et al. (2005)

Integrated Bio-Behavioral Survey (IBBS) among Male Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) in the Kathmandu Valley. FHI and USAID (2005) HIV transmission among drug users is associated with injecting drug use that involves the sharing of needles or syringes. Risky sexual behavior associated with drug use also contributes to the spread of HIV. Injecting drug users function as a “bridging population” for HIV transmission between a core HIV risk group, other high-risk groups and the general population. The main objective of this study was “to estimate the prevalence rate of HIV among injecting drug users (IDUs) and assess their risky behavior". The study was conducted in the Kathmandu Valley. Three hundred male IDUs were sampled using the respondent driven sampling (RDS) methodology. While structured questionnaires were used to collect behavioral data, clinical blood tests were used to determine the rate of HIV infection. The clinical test procedure used involved collecting blood from a subject’s pricked finger and then storing it in 2-4 capillary tubes until tests could be performed. In order to determine a participant's infection status, a rapid test kit algorithm was used in which two rapid tests (Capillus and Determine) were initially conducted with Uni-Gold reserved as a tie-breaker.

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Integrated Bio-Behavioral Survey (IBBS) among Male Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) in Western to Far Western Terai 2005. New ERA, STD/AIDS Counseling and Training Services, FHI, et al (2005)

Integrated Bio-Behavioral Survey (IBBS) among Male Injecting Drug Users (IDUs) in Western to Far Western Terai 2005. FHI and USAID (2005) HIV transmission among drug users is associated with injecting drug use that involves the sharing of needles or syringes. Risky sexual behavior associated with drug use also contributes to the spread of HIV. Injecting drug users function as a “bridging population” for HIV transmission between a core HIV risk group, other high-risk groups and the general population. The main objective of this study was “to estimate the prevalence rate of HIV among injecting drug users (IDUs) and assess their risky behavior". The study was conducted among IDUs in the municipalities and highway areas of Rupandehi, Banke, Kailali and Kanchanpur districts of the Western to Far Western Terai. Three hundred male IDUs were sampled using the respondent driven sampling (RDS) methodology. While structured questionnaires were used to collect behavioral data, clinical blood tests were used to determine the rate of HIV infection. The clinical test procedure used involved collecting blood from a subject’s pricked finger and then storing it in 2-4 capillary tubes until tests could be performed. In order to determine a participant's infection status, a rapid test kit algorithm was used in which two rapid tests (Capillus and Determine) were initially conducted with Uni-Gold reserved as a tie-breaker. In terms of socio- demographic characteristics, the study found that the median age of the IDUs was 25 years. About half of them were previously or currently married. The median age at marriage was 21 years. A majority of the IDUs had formal schooling. IDUs from different ethnic backgrounds participated in the study.

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Patterns of HIV Prevalence among Injecting Drug Users in the Cross-border Area of Lang Son Province, Vietnam, and Ning Ming County, Guangxi Province, China. Jarlais DCD, Johnston P, Friedmann P, et al (2005)

cover-coming-soon

To assess patterns of injecting drug use and HIV prevalence among injecting drug users
(IDUs) in an international border area along a major heroin trans-shipment route.


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Policy and Programming Guide for HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care among Injecting Drug Users. WHO (2005)

Policy and Programming Guide for HIV/AIDS Prevention and Care among Injecting Drug Users. WHO (2005) The epidemic of HIV infection and AIDS among injecting drug users (IDUs) and its spread from IDU populations to their sexual partners and the wider community is an important but often neglected aspect of the global AIDS pandemic. This neglect has resulted from:

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Advocacy Guide: HIV/AIDS Prevention among Injecting Drug Users. WHO, UNAIDS and UNODC (2004)

Advocacy Guide: HIV/AIDS Prevention among Injecting Drug Users. WHO, UNAIDS and UNODC (2004) The World Health Organization (WHO), the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) developed this guide jointly based on a wealth of experiences by individuals, institutions and nongovernmental and international organizations on the role of advocacy in establishing HIV/AIDS prevention and care programmes for injecting drug users (IDUs).

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Availability of ARV for Injecting Drug Users: Key Facts. Coalition ARV4IDUs (2004)

Availability of ARV for Injecting Drug Users: Key Facts. ARV4IDUs (2004) While exact figures are difficult to obtain, recent estimates suggest that there are over 13 million injecting drug users (IDUs) worldwide. More than ten million of these live in the developing world.

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Capacity Building in Peer Education for the Prevention of HIV/AIDS, Substance Abuse and Drug Related Harm. UNICEF and Yayasan Kita (2004)

Capacity Building in Peer Education for the Prevention of HIV/AIDS, Substance Abuse and Drug Related Harm. UNICEF and Yayasan Kita (2004) The following report was developed as a contracted activity on behalf of UNICEF. The period of performance was 1 –15 August 2004. A draft report was presented on 13 August 2004 and this final report was submitted on 15 August 2004. The report introduction will provide a brief summary of the project on which this report is focused, as well as an overview of this specific assignment.

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Effectiveness of Sterile Needle and Syringe Programming in Reducing HIV/AIDS among IDUs. WHO (2004)

Effectiveness of Sterile Needle and Syringe Programming in Reducing HIV/AIDS among IDUs. WHO (2004) The global environment for a response to HIV has shifted substantially towards a massive scaling up of prevention, treatment and care interventions. In particular, the world made an unprecedented commitment during the United Nations Special Session on HIV/AIDS in 2001 to halt- ing and reversing the epidemic by 2015. In support of this, additional resources to fund an expanded response have been come available through the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

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Expanding Access to HIV/AIDS Treatment: Mission Report Indonesia. WHO (2004)

Expanding Access to HIV/AIDS Treatment: Mission Report Indonesia. WHO (2004) Recently, Indonesia has adopted an ambitious target of providing antiretroviral treatment (ART) to at least 10 000 people by the end of 2005. As of January 2004, of an estimated 15 000 people who were in need of ART, only 1300 persons were receiving the treatment. The intermediate target for 2005 is in line with the global WHO and UNAIDS "3 by 5" initiative. The initiative aims to provide three million people in developing countries (out of six million in need globally) access to ART by the end of 2005. The ultimate goal of the initiative is to provide universal access.

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Highlighted publications
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS-young-peoples-participation-in-community-based-responses-to-hiv_2019.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNODC_factsheet_Ending_AIDS_by_2030_for_people_and_with_PUD_2018.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_GAP_progress_report_2019.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/HRI-women-harm-reduction-2018.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Elective_C-section_should_not_be_routinely_recommended_to_WLHIV_2018.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/ESCAP_Asia_and_the_Pacific_SDG_Progress_Report_2019.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Guideline_on_digital_interventions_for_health_system_strengthening_2019.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Progress_report_on_HIV_viral_hepatitis_and_STI_2019.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_HIV_UHC_Guide_Civil_Society_2019.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NSACP_Sri_Lanka_Annual_Report_2018.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_HIV-related-travel-restrictions-explainer_2019.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/HIV-and-the-Law-supplement-2018.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Myanmar_IBBS_and_Population_size_estimates_among_FSW_2015.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Global_TB_Report_2018.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Nepal_National_Community_Led_HIV_Testing_Guidelines_2018.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Cambodia_IBBS_PWID_PWUD_2017.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Cambodia_IBBS_FEW_2017.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/DataHub_TB-HIV_Fact_Sheet_2018.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NSACP_Sri_Lanka_National_HIV_Communication_Strategy_2017.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_Status_of_National_AIDS_Response_2017.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_State_Epi_factsheets_V1_North-East_region_2017.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_State_Epi_factsheets_V2_West_South_region_2017.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_State_Epi_factsheets_V3_Northern_Central_Eastern_region_2017.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/NACO_Annual_report_2016-17.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Guidelines_for_Managing_Advanced_HIV_Disease_and_Rapid_Initiation_of_ART_2017.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Cambodia_Estimations_and_projections_of_HIV_AIDS_at_Sub-national_level_2016-2020.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_HIV_drug_resistance_report_2017.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Guidelines_on_public_health_response_to_pretreatment_HIV_drug_resistance_2017.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/Myanmar_National_Strategic_Plan_on_HIV_and_AIDS_2016-2020.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/UNAIDS_methods_for_deriving_estimates_2016.pdf
https://aidsdatahub.org/sites/default/files/highlight-reference/document/WHO_Consolidated_on_the_use_of_antiretroviral_drugs_for_treating_and_preventing_HIV_infection_2016.pdf
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